Open Source Alliance Cyberjaya

The Linux and Open Source Special Interest Group in Cyberjaya, Malaysia

Analysis of New Perspectives on Public Goods Production

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I recently got through reading the paper by Jyh-An Lee [PDF warning], who is a J.S.D. candidate and a Law and Economics fellow at Stanford, about the policy implications of open source software and thought it sufficiently comprehensive and well written. I consider research on this subject to be timely and appropriate for several reasons, of which the growing relevance of public policy on open source software (OSS) is but one. While open source is an undeniable production [development] and distribution model, it is first and foremost a disruptive force. I’m neither the first nor the most eloquent in stating that open source is far bigger than the software industry and even IT in general. While what is being witnessed within the software industry remains a compelling case for the potential of open source as a bona-fide disruptive force, it should be kept in proper perspective of the general trend towards open paradigms.

Even specifically within the scope of software as assets (open or closed, public or private) it is prudent to recognize its role as disruptive force. By doing so, the need for participation by various spheres within the social/political/business stratum (individuals, groups, public, private, etc.) becomes effectively clear. In this way, the aforementioned research is particularly germane in underscoring the ramifications of government policy on open source software. Below I’ve included analysis of some key topics and positions presented therein.

Read more: Alex Fletcher

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Written by syazli7

Sun, 10 Jun 2007 at 02:35:54 +0800

Posted in News

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